The making of a head board

Now originally I had wanted to keep this blog to upcycled sewing projects but since it’s my goal to share that you really don’t need a lot of experience to create new things out of the old I decided to create this post dedicated to the creation of my head board.

I recently got a new bed frame, and it’s great. Has drawers in the bottom and everything. Unfortunately it doesn’t come with a headboard. This posses a problem as my pillows are now falling into the crack between my bed and the wall because they aren’t flush up against each other. So a headboard is definitely in order. Now I had originally planed on buying one but with the unique shape of my bed frame I decided it would be easier to make one than to find one that fit.

I found some good wood that I liked the style of from a neighbor I had three pieces and quickly started to get to work.

First step to was to clean the boards, because they were covered in cobwebs and dirt. After they were scrubbed down then the prep work started.

Step 1: Sand them down. The boards were pretty rough and although they weren’t in bad shape I definitely needed to smooth them out before I did the next step

Step 2:

(Unfortunately I️ don’t have pictures from this point)

Cutting them into size. I️ measured my bed frame repeatedly before I️ got to sawing. I️ ended up doing this by hand with a hand saw. I️ dont happen to have power tools. I️ cut two larger pieces for the front of the frame and then 4 smaller ones that I️ will connected to create the height.

Step 3:

My dad and I️ ended up driving to Lowe’s to buy wood for the sides of the frame and the top. 2 pieces and a large 2×4 later we are good:).

Luckily for my family, we have access to the scene shop in my school and so my dad and I️ used the power tools to cut the wood to match the larger and smaller pieces of decorative wood from before.

Step 4:


Once we hauled everything home we attached the decorative side pieces to the wood and then the top to the side pieces. We used chucks of the 2×4 to help secure everything together along the seams.

Step 5:


Finally, the headboard was built and so the last step was decorating and final touches. I️ used wood-filler to fill in any holes in the headboard and once it was dry I️ sanded it down.

Then the entire headboard got several layers of white paint. I️ ended up spray painting the top gold once that was dry.


I️ will put up a picture of the finished product later. I️ stupidly forgot to take one before I️ move it into my room 😔


The Best of Me Inspired Sun Dress [Part 2]


*Disclaimer: I do not complete projects in the order I present them in on here. I’ve just decided for the sake of convenience to section them off but in reality, I bounce all over the place on the project until it is finished which will explain why I say certain things on a project have been done even though I never talked about it.

**All the pictures are before-sewed because I like to get all of the sewing done in one go at the very end and didn’t feel like taking more pictures

Placing what was left of the dress after I cut the bodice piece off on a skirt hanger IIMG_3270IMG_3271IMG_3265 marked where the fabric hit my belly button after lining the hem up with where I wanted it to land (never waste a perfectly good hem if you don’t have to) and then penciled the line all the way around and then added a 3/4 inch seam allowance.  Then cut.



Once done and before I took to the sewing machine to gather the top, I made the decision to seam rip the center back seam in order to allow for the zipper to be added later and to make the gathering process easier.   (as you can tell in the picture I opted to not cut through the bottom hem because I decided it was unnecessary and would look weird later. Remeber, the only times that you should do more work than strictly necessary with up-cycling is when the project will benefit from it. Me cutting the hem would have done no good or benefited the project so I didn’t .)



To gather I stitched on the largest length of stitch that my machine allows twice within the seam allowance without creating a stop stitch on either end. After completing that I tied off one side of the skirt and gathered the waist by pulling on only one string from each set from the two stitches on the other side. Once the skirt’s waist measured the same as mine, I adjusted the gathers to be evenly distributed along the waistline and then set my machine to a stitch length significantly less than before and sewed over the gathers in-between the two gather stitches. ( The last stitch will not prevent you from being able to adjust the gathers throughout the project, meaning it will not lock them in place. It simply prevents them from going everywhere everytime you touch it. Not strictly necessary but better to be safe than sorry)

Next was the waist band that will go between the bodice and the skirt. Not entirely necessary but the Blue dress has one so I wanted one too.

For the waist band, it was pretty simple, I cut a 3-inch wide section out of the left over IMG_3274fabric I had after cutting out the bodice and the skirt and added a 1/2 inch seam allowance. After working with it for a while as the skirt section was curved, I (mostly) uncurved the piece and decided to line it with a light white material that I had from a pillow case from who knows how long ago. This would prevent the pattern on the inside part of the waist band from being visible on the outside because the dress material is so light. I sewed them right-sides-together and flipped them inside out.

IMG_3285Once done I folded in half making sure that the seams were pressed as close of the outside as possible and then ironed it. After I had completed it I then attached it to the waist of the skirt by folding it over the gathers and sewing it down by the bottom.




Zipper: The zipper was by far the easiest part of this whole process. I had a metal zipperIMG_3284 that I had recovered from a pair of boots that I had to throw out about a year ago. I used one of the two I had and it was the absolute perfect length at just about 7”. I simply tucked the top of the zipper under the waist band and followed the seam indent left on the seam I had ripped earlier down it. I personally wanted the zipper to be visible because I think it adds some extra detail, so I didn’t position the fabric to cover it up but if you want to recreate the Blue Dress more accurately, I suggest getting an invisible zipper in a matching color to your fabric. Anyways, I then simply ended the zipper by hand sewing several times over the bottom of the track and then just sewed the rest of the seam down to the hem as normal.


The Next post up should be the Bodice and after that should be the final project!!!

Can’t wait for you to see it,


The Best of Me Inspired Sun Dress [Part 1]

Quite a while ago I got my hands on a beautiful maxi dress that has a great flower designFullSizeRender (1) on it. Now I don’t like how maxi’s particularly look on myself but because its pattern is just too stunning to toss out, I’ve been hoarding it in my fabric drawer until I found the perfect way to up-cycle it.  Recently I was reintroduced to the Nicholas Sparks film The Best of Me where the younger version of one of the main characters, Amanda, wears this really unique backless blue dress. I’ve also been searching for a fun summer dress to wear for my senior photos, and what could be more perfect than a custom made one!

The Blue Dress:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The first step was doing research on the Blue Dress and finding pictures to use as a reference for the project. I also went ahead and washed and ironed the flower dress so it is prepped.

During my research, I found that the Blue dress was custom made for the movie. Which means if I want one I have to make it myself!

From examining the photos the construction appears to be relatively basic, which means I won’t have to utilize any special techniques or materials to pull it off!


  • Flower Dress
  • White fabric (either heavy or lightweight)
  • Cream/mint thread
  • Zipper (also upcycled)
  • Boning
  • cups (optional)
  • Dress Form
  • Other sewing supplies (machine, pins, needles, etc.)

I sketched up a basic breakdown of the dress so I could understand better how all the IMG_3258parts fit together. And then examined the flower dress to decide how I wanted to break it up. When you up-cycle clothes it’s important to really understand where the seams are located on the garment along with any other details that it might have. For example, the bodice of the Blue Dress appears to be all one piece of fabric without seams for the bust. My Flower dress, however, has princess seams down the front which means that my remake will have to include those seams even though the original might not.

I’m going to go ahead and start working on this project and give you updates as I go:)

Talk later,


Cat Noir Footie Pajamas [ Part:2]

Let’s Get Started!

The first big alteration was removing the giant Minnie Mouse head that is the middle of the garment.Displaying IMG_3186.JPG

This took me a considerable amount of time due to all of the embroidery that was used. A seam ripper was my absolute best friend during this process, along with the help of a very sharp pair of scissors that I used to slice sections that I couldn’t wiggle the seam ripper under and a large safety pin that helped me pick away cut threads. Overall the process took (time total) maybe a week or so.

I did end up catching and slicing the fabric a few times, which is always a concern when attempting to remove embroidery,  but the holes were small enough that I just mended them with some black thread. This is the garment after the embroidery was removed and the holes were fixed.


Pins are placed along the zipper seams because the embroidery was wrapped into the seam and so to remove all of the embroideries it was necessary to remove it.  In addition to removing the embroidery, I also removed the ears from the hood and the leopard print fabric from the sleeves.

Hood and Sleeves after:






Next step is going to be taking the curved mouse ears that were removed from the hood and reshaping them into cat ears and reattaching them along with sewing up the zipper seam.

See you next time:)


Cat Noir Footie Pajamas [ Part:1]

Info, Materials, Preparing


As an adamant viewer of the tv show Miraculous: Tales of Ladybug and Cat Noir, (for those who are interested link to Wiki )as any fangirl, when I realized I had the materials to create a Cat Noir Onesie I jumped at the chance. I do want to credit this project however because it was inspired by this section of a comic created by

seredipitous fate

The first step was gathering the base and evaluating what materials I’ll need. I try to not buy materials when I don’t have to and I was fortunate enough to already have a black onesie that fit but I wasn’t wearing anymore. Exhibit A:

Displaying IMG_3184.JPG

Full View

Displaying IMG_3186.JPG

Front center

Displaying IMG_3188.JPG



Un-used Onesie

Green fleece

Black thread

A bell

                                                                                                                 other sewing tools like pins, needles, sewing machine, etc.


As you can tell there is quite a bit of work that must be done to this garment to create the desired look but I’m excited to get started on it!



I’m going to try to keep this relativly short and sweet: My name is Katie and I’m a HighSchool Senior that is active in her theatre program as the Student Director and Stage Manager with a love for sewing and crafting. I’ve had an interest in sewing ever since I was 7 and was convinced I was Laura Ingles Wilder. Ever since I’ve been very active with upgrading and gaining new sewing skills to utilize during my various projects. In the most recent years, I’ve developed a love for upcycling any clothes that come into my clutches and seem to be in good condition along with doing slight alterations.  I wanted to start this blog to document my progress through these projects and demonstrate that you don’t need to go out and specifically buy new clothes when it is entirely plausible to create and re-make yourself.

My projects range from basic sewing skills for minor fixes to major up-cycles and I’m so happy to share these projects with you.